Posts Tagged ‘Etiquette’

So you finally got that engineer job at the studio you have always wanted to work at. Here I have gave some insight of what it’ll be like and some tips/tricks that will get you past day one.

TIME

1. Respect everyones time. This means don’t be late, have everything setup before the artist gets there, and don’t take 8 smoke breaks for an hour session. All of these things seem like a good way to milk extra money out of the artist but in reality it’s a fast track to lose business. The session should start when the artist walks in because thats when the clock starts rolling for your payment. If you’re not setup before they get there they will just sit there for the half hour it takes you to get ready. That is disrespectful. Keep in mind you’re making their dreams come true so you need a level of trust. It’s hard to get trust if one of you doesn’t respect the other.

BE CLEAN

2. This has to deal with the respect again. If you respect the space you love to work in then your clients are more likely to love it as well. A few tips would be clean up any trash or dirty dishes laying around, leave the studio as clean as you found it, and make sure to clean your pop filter every once in a while. Also make sure your personal hygiene is taken care of as well. I can’t tell you how many sessions I have been in where one dude smells unbearable bad. Keep in mind you are in small rooms with these people so make sure to use deodorant and maybe take a shower. Gum is always a great thing to have.

COMMUNICATION

3. This is probably the most important thing you can do to get what you want out of the artist. Most artist don’t want to hear about the technical stuff they just want to lay down their song and get the hell out of there. So don’t bore them with it. If you have some input or advice think about how you will tell them so you don’t bore them or seem condescending. In between each take make sure to talk to them and let them know what is going on. It could be anything but you want to keep the momentum going.

YOUR GOAL

4. Keep in mind you are doing the artist a service so don’t give them creative suggestions unless they are completely okay with it, or if it’s something like “take a few steps away from the mic”. Your job is basically to capture the best sonic and creative performance possible, nothing more. It is always good to ask if they are open to suggestions at the beginning of or maybe even before a session.

This job is not like anything else in the world but the personality traits that you must have are the same for any business.